working class whore-o

even if you have hundreds of women at your disposal, it wont fill the void…

Robert Rosen: What came across in the diaries was a combination of boredom, pain, isolation and confusion. What astonished me about the diaries is here’s an ex-Beatle, who has 150 million dollars, who is living in the Dakota, downtown from where I was living in Washington Heights at the time, and you would think that somebody in this position would have a life which is completely different from mine. At the time I was a starving artist living in a garret. Yet, his diaries seemed to be so strikingly similar to my own sense of being isolated and adrift in New York City. He had all these things and yet it didn’t seem to make much of a difference. He had a few more zeroes at the end of his monthly living expenses, but in terms of what he was doing hour-to-hour, day-to-day it was not terribly different from what I was doing, which was essentially sitting alone in my room writing in a notebook.

Vision: How would you describe his relationship with Yoko Ono?

RR: They had been married 11 years at his death. She was the mother of his child and he certainly believed in Yoko’s powers whatever they might be. I think in part he felt cut off from Yoko; he didn’t see her as much as he wanted. He was upstairs in his bedroom watching TV, smoking weed, or programming dreams and she was downstairs in Studio One conducting business. Or he was in Bermuda, working on the demo tape for Double Fantasy and she was in New York doing what she wanted. Lennon spent a lot of time longing for the simple pleasure of spending time with his wife. They were having marital problems-their sex life was not what he wanted it to be and he was frustrated by that too.

Vision: Why did Lennon and Ono go to such extremes to convince the world of their love?

RR: The idea of projecting this image was important to them. They wanted the world to think that they were the ideal, happy couple. Part of it was a propaganda war against Paul McCartney. It was very important to Lennon that he was doing better than McCartney, that he was happier than McCartney. I went into great detail in the book about how he was extremely jealous of McCartney, who was constantly putting out hit after hit while Lennon was isolated in the Dakota doing nothing. McCartney was happily married to Linda, had a big happy family and that drove Lennon nuts, he was very jealous. Lennon wanted to be the one who was happier, had more money, had more hit records. So Lennon and Yoko were projecting this happy image to the media. This was part of their magic. According to magical theory, if they were projecting this image in the media, and the world perceived it this way, then it was true. The idea of them being an eccentric, but happily married couple was not entirely false. There was a grain of truth in the myth. They were just amplifying it.

Vision: Yoko’s influence over Lennon in the mystical arts was very strong.

RR: There is absolutely no question that Yoko got him into all of the occult stuff because she was very into it. She believed in numerology and astrology in part because these are Japanese traditions. In 1977, Ono went to Columbia, in South America, to meet with a witch, whom she paid $60,000 to teach her to cast magical spells. A lot of this interest in the occult was driven by the fact that they felt powerless, there were always legal battles and the perpetual money squabbles with Apple Records. They were trying to find some way to fight the lawyers and the people at Apple with something that was guaranteed to work. They were seeking security in an insecure world. Part of what makes magic work is the belief that it works. Also behind their magic was their incredible wealth which allowed them to influence people. So perhaps there was something to their magic.

Vision: What inspiration would Lennon want to pass on to his fans?

RR: Part of John’s message going back to 1965, was that he didn’t want people to follow him or see him as a Christ-like figure, guru or someone with all of the answers. He wanted people to seek the answers in themselves. To think for themselves just like the song says. To not accept things at face value, to look at things as they are and to think about them. And to understand that no matter how much wealth, fame and power you have there are still many things in your life that you can’t control. What Lennon really wanted to do was to lead a pure life. That was his constant struggle and I think if he was trying to pass a message on it would be to try and follow “the way” as he tried to. Sometimes he succeeded and sometimes he failed, but he did try. He could have just said, “Forget it, I’m going to enjoy all my money, houses and travel.” But he had all of these things and still struggled to stay on the path and follow the way, which was very inspiring. He fought against corruption, the corruption of himself.

http://www.john-lennon.com/nowhereman.htm

why would a “happy” man decline to looking like an AIDS patient?

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